30+ Sensory Diet Activities for Every Sense!

Updated: 4 days ago

Once you understand a child's sensory profile (use this guide to get a free PDF checklist), you can start to create a sensory diet. These are a carefully selected set of sensory activities that meet an individual's needs, i.e. their seeking and avoiding behaviours. Sensory diets allow children to engage in things that they like whilst also helping them gradually approach their sensory challenges whilst also giving you tips on things to avoid. Here are some activities for both seeking and avoiding profiles for each sense.



Auditory

Sound is probably one of most common sensitivities, especially in children with autism.

Auditory Seeking

  • Offer toys that produce lots of sounds - shakers, drums, echo microphones, musical toys

  • Use songs to teach concepts - ABC's, numbers, colours etc

  • Play music in the background whilst working

  • Read books aloud

Auditory Avoiding



Visual

Sound is probably one of most common sensitivities, especially in children with autism.

Visual Seeking

  • Offer lots of opportunities for visual stimulation

  • Use toys or items with lots of changing colours, e.g. LED lights

  • Introduce optical illusions

  • Use visually stimulating toys like kaleidoscopes, fidget spinners, sensory toys and view finders

  • Play I-Spy games

  • Do lots of arts and crafts, e.g. painting, connect the dots, colouring, glitter painting

Visual Avoiding


Touch/Tactile

Touch is a difficult sense to understand; that’s because six different types of sensory receptors sense different types of touch. So, you may have mixed responses because your child may be a seeker of some forms of tactile input and an avoider of others. Try different sensory strategies to find what works best.

Tactile Seeking


Tactile Avoiding



Smell and Taste

Smell and taste are grouped because they’re so closely related to each other. They’re both known as “chemical senses” because the sensory receptors receive messages from the molecular particles when they come in contact with them.



Smell/Taste Seeking

  • Use essential oils or diffusers in the home.

  • Use scented play-dough, markers or stickers

  • Paint with spices or herbs

  • Encourage them to get involved with cooking or baking a lot, both in school and at home

  • Offer toys for chewing

  • Offer foods with an intense flavour, for example sour foods or spicy foods.

  • Crunchy foods are great - raw carrots/celery/cucumber, crackers, pretzels

Smell/Taste Avoiding



Proprioception

Smell and taste are grouped because they’re so closely related to each other. They’re both known as “chemical senses” because the sensory receptors receive messages from the molecular particles when they come in c



Proprioception Seeking

  • Heavy work games and activities like tug-o-war, pushing and pulling heavy items, gardening

  • Stretching activities like yoga, pilates, Simon Says

  • High movement activities like trampolining, gymnastics, swimming etc. Seekers need lots of time to be active including moderate to intense physical activity.

  • Deep pressure like using weighted blankets, massage and large hugs


Proprioception Avoiding



151 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All